Monday, November 5, 2007

Dresden Restoration Completed

With the exception of a good soak and block, she is done. 60 x 60, about 3/4 of its original size, and 14 of 20 blocks salvaged. (pictured here 12, I saved 2 for the grand daughter to make a little something for her sister. Its been several months as you know, and a lot of perseverance, not to mention nimble finger work. I so enjoyed the journey, and will cherish the time that I had with Grandmother Amanda's quilt. I know I'm sappy... but, I helped preserve history both in materialness, and sentiment, and it just felt good. I guess as I have told you before, maybe a part of me wishes that it was MY grandmother, not a lil ole lady I never had the pleasure of meeting physically. It just felt right. Thats all I have to say about that. The process?









The entire quilt was disassembled (completly) and those parts that were ragged and torn set aside. Each blade that "made the cut" was reassembled and returned to a plate with the addition of antique feed sacks located online. Walt and I "aged this fabric by method of sea salt, Ocean water, sand, and elbow grease. I then cut new blades to match Grandmas, and reassembled with old blades. Once the plates were remade, the original caps went on, and stitched where needed in center pedal. Reproduction fabric was used for the block foundations. Now the needle turning begins. Thank God I have friends who love me enough to needleturn with me!(again, TY Sharon & Ronda) This process must have taken Amanda a year at best!
Blocks were assembled in rows of 4, and then machine quilted with (thanks be to Ronda sending me that wonderful book!) Hari Walner quilt designs from yesteryear. It is more quilting than Grandma did, but it needed to be down at least this much. Two batts were used, one for foundation (QD cotton) one on top 4 ounce poly for space filling and to preserve old fabrics should they happen to be folded for storage. The backing was again, reproduction polka dot fabric, and the binding the same as the blocks. The fabric label has been left blank for the owners words of wisdom:) It really should hold up well for another hundred years now...smiling....I know that the grand daughter, Mary, will love it always:)
Thanks for listening to my journey all of the way. It has helped to yak about it! It was my greatest restoration challenge to date, exceeding the GFG last year by far. Enjoy the photos. I wish my photographer was handy to get better ones for me. Grunt.

10 comments:

Anonymous said...

Bravo!!! Well done my friend, looks like a completly new quilt, they will be thrilled, lucky them.

Now onto the christmas rush.

LU. B.

Randi said...

Amazing! I am SO PROUD OF YOU!!!

Jackie said...

WOW! Your work on the Dresden plate is amazing!

Anonymous said...

Ok...... you just blew us away. That is just amazing. Great job!

Gayle and Steve

Ronda Beyer said...

WOW, you rock, great job it is fabulous, love it. You did alot of hard work on this and it paid off, thanks for sharing and I am glad I could share in your journey...

Karen Schmidt said...

What a fabulous job Gina!!
You should be very proud.

Deb said...

You are amazing! What a total transformation! Ya did good! More balls than I...tackling something like that...WTG!

Freda said...

The quilt is great Gina.

Freda

Lynn Douglass said...

Holy smokes, Gina! You are awesome! The quilt looks lovely! Happy late anniversary to you and Walt, too. See how much I miss when I'm gone? Sheesh!

Carla said...

I'm amazed at the quilt, Gina. What a tremendous amount of work you've done. The fabrics look tremendous... just beautiful! It's hard to believe this is the same quilt top you had during Ronda's class.

Related Posts with Thumbnails